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Fatshion Bloggers Make Plus-Size Chic
This story was produced in partnership with The Daily Beast.
Short of having a bucket of blood dumped over your head at prom, few things compare to the humiliation of being the only customer browsing the racks of an overpriced lingerie store and hearing the painfully chic saleswoman — who’d begrudgingly buzzed you in — loudly proclaim, “I wish people would realize we don’t stock sizes larger than a medium.”
Anyone who’s ever attempted to shop at a schmancy boutique in a body that’s larger than a size 10 already knows that buying big-girl garb requires a skin that’s nearly as thick as your waistline. Fat-loathing is the last acceptable prejudice, and nowhere is that more pronounced than in the world of fashion.
“I have a genuine hatred reserved for cut-out shoulders, drawstring waists, loud prints, cargo pants, waterfall cardigans and hanky hems,” says 28-year-old British blogger Lauren Ding. “It’s so difficult to find something that is not only my style, but that fits well.”
Which may account for the recent explosion of so-called “fatshion” blogging — the tag used by hordes of plus-size bloggers who are melding the two worlds. Until recently, fashion blogging had been the domain of straight-sized women. But sick of being ignored by fashion mags and relegated to sack dresses with screeching prints, a growing number of women — unapologetically plump, and tired of being treated like third-class citizens — are taking their musings online. They post OOTDs (outfits of the day) and ruminate on body positivity. Many of them, as a backdrop to skinny models storming the runways of New York Fashion Week, have started calling this month “Fatshion February” — and are blogging aggressively in its honor.

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storyboard:


Fatshion Bloggers Make Plus-Size Chic
This story was produced in partnership with The Daily Beast.
Short of having a bucket of blood dumped over your head at prom, few things compare to the humiliation of being the only customer browsing the racks of an overpriced lingerie store and hearing the painfully chic saleswoman — who’d begrudgingly buzzed you in — loudly proclaim, “I wish people would realize we don’t stock sizes larger than a medium.”
Anyone who’s ever attempted to shop at a schmancy boutique in a body that’s larger than a size 10 already knows that buying big-girl garb requires a skin that’s nearly as thick as your waistline. Fat-loathing is the last acceptable prejudice, and nowhere is that more pronounced than in the world of fashion.
“I have a genuine hatred reserved for cut-out shoulders, drawstring waists, loud prints, cargo pants, waterfall cardigans and hanky hems,” says 28-year-old British blogger Lauren Ding. “It’s so difficult to find something that is not only my style, but that fits well.”
Which may account for the recent explosion of so-called “fatshion” blogging — the tag used by hordes of plus-size bloggers who are melding the two worlds. Until recently, fashion blogging had been the domain of straight-sized women. But sick of being ignored by fashion mags and relegated to sack dresses with screeching prints, a growing number of women — unapologetically plump, and tired of being treated like third-class citizens — are taking their musings online. They post OOTDs (outfits of the day) and ruminate on body positivity. Many of them, as a backdrop to skinny models storming the runways of New York Fashion Week, have started calling this month “Fatshion February” — and are blogging aggressively in its honor.

Read More
Zoom Info
storyboard:


Fatshion Bloggers Make Plus-Size Chic
This story was produced in partnership with The Daily Beast.
Short of having a bucket of blood dumped over your head at prom, few things compare to the humiliation of being the only customer browsing the racks of an overpriced lingerie store and hearing the painfully chic saleswoman — who’d begrudgingly buzzed you in — loudly proclaim, “I wish people would realize we don’t stock sizes larger than a medium.”
Anyone who’s ever attempted to shop at a schmancy boutique in a body that’s larger than a size 10 already knows that buying big-girl garb requires a skin that’s nearly as thick as your waistline. Fat-loathing is the last acceptable prejudice, and nowhere is that more pronounced than in the world of fashion.
“I have a genuine hatred reserved for cut-out shoulders, drawstring waists, loud prints, cargo pants, waterfall cardigans and hanky hems,” says 28-year-old British blogger Lauren Ding. “It’s so difficult to find something that is not only my style, but that fits well.”
Which may account for the recent explosion of so-called “fatshion” blogging — the tag used by hordes of plus-size bloggers who are melding the two worlds. Until recently, fashion blogging had been the domain of straight-sized women. But sick of being ignored by fashion mags and relegated to sack dresses with screeching prints, a growing number of women — unapologetically plump, and tired of being treated like third-class citizens — are taking their musings online. They post OOTDs (outfits of the day) and ruminate on body positivity. Many of them, as a backdrop to skinny models storming the runways of New York Fashion Week, have started calling this month “Fatshion February” — and are blogging aggressively in its honor.

Read More
Zoom Info
storyboard:


Fatshion Bloggers Make Plus-Size Chic
This story was produced in partnership with The Daily Beast.
Short of having a bucket of blood dumped over your head at prom, few things compare to the humiliation of being the only customer browsing the racks of an overpriced lingerie store and hearing the painfully chic saleswoman — who’d begrudgingly buzzed you in — loudly proclaim, “I wish people would realize we don’t stock sizes larger than a medium.”
Anyone who’s ever attempted to shop at a schmancy boutique in a body that’s larger than a size 10 already knows that buying big-girl garb requires a skin that’s nearly as thick as your waistline. Fat-loathing is the last acceptable prejudice, and nowhere is that more pronounced than in the world of fashion.
“I have a genuine hatred reserved for cut-out shoulders, drawstring waists, loud prints, cargo pants, waterfall cardigans and hanky hems,” says 28-year-old British blogger Lauren Ding. “It’s so difficult to find something that is not only my style, but that fits well.”
Which may account for the recent explosion of so-called “fatshion” blogging — the tag used by hordes of plus-size bloggers who are melding the two worlds. Until recently, fashion blogging had been the domain of straight-sized women. But sick of being ignored by fashion mags and relegated to sack dresses with screeching prints, a growing number of women — unapologetically plump, and tired of being treated like third-class citizens — are taking their musings online. They post OOTDs (outfits of the day) and ruminate on body positivity. Many of them, as a backdrop to skinny models storming the runways of New York Fashion Week, have started calling this month “Fatshion February” — and are blogging aggressively in its honor.

Read More
Zoom Info
storyboard:


Fatshion Bloggers Make Plus-Size Chic
This story was produced in partnership with The Daily Beast.
Short of having a bucket of blood dumped over your head at prom, few things compare to the humiliation of being the only customer browsing the racks of an overpriced lingerie store and hearing the painfully chic saleswoman — who’d begrudgingly buzzed you in — loudly proclaim, “I wish people would realize we don’t stock sizes larger than a medium.”
Anyone who’s ever attempted to shop at a schmancy boutique in a body that’s larger than a size 10 already knows that buying big-girl garb requires a skin that’s nearly as thick as your waistline. Fat-loathing is the last acceptable prejudice, and nowhere is that more pronounced than in the world of fashion.
“I have a genuine hatred reserved for cut-out shoulders, drawstring waists, loud prints, cargo pants, waterfall cardigans and hanky hems,” says 28-year-old British blogger Lauren Ding. “It’s so difficult to find something that is not only my style, but that fits well.”
Which may account for the recent explosion of so-called “fatshion” blogging — the tag used by hordes of plus-size bloggers who are melding the two worlds. Until recently, fashion blogging had been the domain of straight-sized women. But sick of being ignored by fashion mags and relegated to sack dresses with screeching prints, a growing number of women — unapologetically plump, and tired of being treated like third-class citizens — are taking their musings online. They post OOTDs (outfits of the day) and ruminate on body positivity. Many of them, as a backdrop to skinny models storming the runways of New York Fashion Week, have started calling this month “Fatshion February” — and are blogging aggressively in its honor.

Read More
Zoom Info
storyboard:


Fatshion Bloggers Make Plus-Size Chic
This story was produced in partnership with The Daily Beast.
Short of having a bucket of blood dumped over your head at prom, few things compare to the humiliation of being the only customer browsing the racks of an overpriced lingerie store and hearing the painfully chic saleswoman — who’d begrudgingly buzzed you in — loudly proclaim, “I wish people would realize we don’t stock sizes larger than a medium.”
Anyone who’s ever attempted to shop at a schmancy boutique in a body that’s larger than a size 10 already knows that buying big-girl garb requires a skin that’s nearly as thick as your waistline. Fat-loathing is the last acceptable prejudice, and nowhere is that more pronounced than in the world of fashion.
“I have a genuine hatred reserved for cut-out shoulders, drawstring waists, loud prints, cargo pants, waterfall cardigans and hanky hems,” says 28-year-old British blogger Lauren Ding. “It’s so difficult to find something that is not only my style, but that fits well.”
Which may account for the recent explosion of so-called “fatshion” blogging — the tag used by hordes of plus-size bloggers who are melding the two worlds. Until recently, fashion blogging had been the domain of straight-sized women. But sick of being ignored by fashion mags and relegated to sack dresses with screeching prints, a growing number of women — unapologetically plump, and tired of being treated like third-class citizens — are taking their musings online. They post OOTDs (outfits of the day) and ruminate on body positivity. Many of them, as a backdrop to skinny models storming the runways of New York Fashion Week, have started calling this month “Fatshion February” — and are blogging aggressively in its honor.

Read More
Zoom Info

storyboard:

Fatshion Bloggers Make Plus-Size Chic

This story was produced in partnership with The Daily Beast.

Short of having a bucket of blood dumped over your head at prom, few things compare to the humiliation of being the only customer browsing the racks of an overpriced lingerie store and hearing the painfully chic saleswoman — who’d begrudgingly buzzed you in — loudly proclaim, “I wish people would realize we don’t stock sizes larger than a medium.”

Anyone who’s ever attempted to shop at a schmancy boutique in a body that’s larger than a size 10 already knows that buying big-girl garb requires a skin that’s nearly as thick as your waistline. Fat-loathing is the last acceptable prejudice, and nowhere is that more pronounced than in the world of fashion.

“I have a genuine hatred reserved for cut-out shoulders, drawstring waists, loud prints, cargo pants, waterfall cardigans and hanky hems,” says 28-year-old British blogger Lauren Ding. “It’s so difficult to find something that is not only my style, but that fits well.”

Which may account for the recent explosion of so-called “fatshion” blogging — the tag used by hordes of plus-size bloggers who are melding the two worlds. Until recently, fashion blogging had been the domain of straight-sized women. But sick of being ignored by fashion mags and relegated to sack dresses with screeching prints, a growing number of women — unapologetically plump, and tired of being treated like third-class citizens — are taking their musings online. They post OOTDs (outfits of the day) and ruminate on body positivity. Many of them, as a backdrop to skinny models storming the runways of New York Fashion Week, have started calling this month “Fatshion February” — and are blogging aggressively in its honor.

Read More

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Above: TEDxYouth@AntarcticPeninsula makes NYC seem a lot more bearable. ©Garry Donaldson/Students on Ice

Preparing for winter storm Nemo? Not sure what to do with your potential snow day (or snow weekend)? We’ve got you covered.
From baby geniuses and an 11-year-old food activist to the secret of living to 100, these top 20 most-watched TEDx talks are sure to fill you up on new ideas while you’re stuck by the fire with a cup of cocoa and a knitted blanket. Bring the marshmallows and we’ve got the inspiration!

The 20 most-watched TEDx talks so far*

  1. Simon Sinek on how great leaders inspire action (filmed at TEDxPugetSound in 2009):
    7,579,005 views
  2. Brené Brown discusses the power of vulnerability (filmed at TEDxHouston in 2010):
    7,029,330 views
  3. Shawn Achor gives us the happy secret to better work (filmed at TEDxBloomington in 2011):
    3,152,254 views
  4. Thomas Suarez is a 12-year-old app developer (filmed at TEDxManhattanBeach in 2011):
    3,053,261 views
  5. Jane Fonda on life’s third act (filmed at TEDxWomen in 2011):
    2,090,958 views
  6. Louie Schwartzberg has three words: Nature. Beauty. Gratitude. (filmed at TEDxSF in 2011):
    1,680,383 views
  7. Jason Fried asks why work doesn’t happen at work (filmed at TEDxMidWest in 2010):
    1,671,347 views
  8. Larry Smith delivers why you will fail to have a great career (filmed at TEDxUW in 2011):
    1,614,299 views
  9. Joe Smith reveals how to use a paper towel (filmed at TEDxConcordiaUPortland in 2012):
    1,585,879 views
  10. Birke Baehr is 11 and knows what’s wrong with our food system (filmed at TEDxNextGenerationAsheville in 2010): 1,544,537 views
  11. Neil Pasricha on the 3 A’s of awesome (filmed at TEDxToronto in 2010):
    1,455,980 views
  12. Nigel Marsh tells us how to make work-life balance work (filmed at TEDxSydney in 2010):
    1,403,385 views
  13. Charlie Todd on the shared experience of absurdity (filmed at TEDxBloomington in 2011):
    1,384,172 views
  14. Luis von Ahn and massive on-scale collaboration (filmed at TEDxCMU in 2011):
    1,242,599 views
  15. Dan Meyer says math class needs a makeover (filmed at TEDxNYED in 2010):
    1,161,857 views
  16. Amy Purdy on living beyond limits (filmed at TEDxOrangeCoast in 2011):
    1,113,388 views
  17. Dan Buettner uncovers how to live to be 100+ (filmed at TEDxTC in 2009):
    1,102,431 views
  18. Erez Lieberman Aiden, Jean-Baptiste Michel and what we learned from 5 million books (filmed at TEDxBoston in 2011): 1,088,771 views
  19. Patricia Kuhl shares the linguistic genius of babies (filmed at TEDxRainier in 2010):
    1,049,003 views
  20. Michael Norton knows how to buy happiness (filmed at TEDxCambridge in 2011):
    997,798 views

*as of October 2012

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